The Toronto Comic Arts Festival 2014Reblogged from The Toronto Comic Arts Festival 2014

torontocomics:

THERE ARE DOZENS OF GREAT NEW COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS DEBUTING AT TCAF!

Whatever your interest in the medium, you’ll find a wonderful new work to enjoy at The Toronto Comic Arts Festival 2014, May 10th and 11th, at Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street.

A full run-down of all of the debuting books, including these excellent new releases and many more, can be found on our Debut Books Page! http://torontocomics.com/books/

Our thanks to the authors and publishers who choose to debut their new graphic novels with us!

Also making its con debut at TCAF? The King’s Dragon.

Really looking forward to a few of these.

The audience actually wants to work for their meal. They just don’t want to know that they’re doing that. That’s your job as a storyteller is to hide the fact that you’re making them work for their meal. We’re born problem solvers. We’re compelled to deduce and to deduct because that’s what we do in real life. It’s this well-organized absence of information that draws us in.

ExploreReblogged from Explore

Pixar filmmaker Andrew Stanton in an altogether fantastic episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour exploring what makes a great story
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - More Acting Less AnatomyI’ve received a few message asking me how to draw simple generic characters (male, female) for story boarding, and what to do when there’s no character design. I will go over all that stuff, but I need to emphasize something first. I used to be obsessed with muscles and specific anatomy when I was drawing anything. Thanks to 90s superhero comic books and raging hormones, it kept me from embracing the storytelling aspect of sketching. Even later on in art school, I would spend WAY took much time on getting that perfect line quality. Animation Storyboarding squashed most of those inclinations out of me, and that’s good. I need to confess that I almost caved in and “cleaned up” the drawings on this page. This is how I draw when do a “first pass” or just trying to find ideas. That way, I don’t lose the energy or feel of my first instinct when approaching a sequence. Here’s something you’ll hear many times if you hang around story people: “It’s not about pretty drawings.” I agree and disagree to a certain extent, but the sentiment is right. It’s about telling a story and not letting other things (like lines, musculature, clothing, etc.) get in the way of doing so clearly.Once again, message me if you have requests for the next installments.Norm

Great advice that should be followed by everyone who drags a pencil across paper (or a stylus across a tablet or screen). High-res

GrizandNormReblogged from GrizandNorm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - More Acting Less Anatomy

I’ve received a few message asking me how to draw simple generic characters (male, female) for story boarding, and what to do when there’s no character design. I will go over all that stuff, but I need to emphasize something first. I used to be obsessed with muscles and specific anatomy when I was drawing anything. Thanks to 90s superhero comic books and raging hormones, it kept me from embracing the storytelling aspect of sketching. Even later on in art school, I would spend WAY took much time on getting that perfect line quality. Animation Storyboarding squashed most of those inclinations out of me, and that’s good. I need to confess that I almost caved in and “cleaned up” the drawings on this page. This is how I draw when do a “first pass” or just trying to find ideas. That way, I don’t lose the energy or feel of my first instinct when approaching a sequence. Here’s something you’ll hear many times if you hang around story people: “It’s not about pretty drawings.” I agree and disagree to a certain extent, but the sentiment is right. It’s about telling a story and not letting other things (like lines, musculature, clothing, etc.) get in the way of doing so clearly.

Once again, message me if you have requests for the next installments.

Norm

Great advice that should be followed by everyone who drags a pencil across paper (or a stylus across a tablet or screen).

(via jeffcrowther)

Source grizandnorm